World Suicide Prevention Day

Each year on the 10th September World Suicide Prevention Day takes place. On this day, the No More Suicide Partnership takes time to remember all those lost to suicide and hosts an event to mark the day. This has been an opportunity to use the power of partnership working to raise awareness of suicide prevention and the valuable interventions which make a real difference.

World Suicide Prevention Day 2020

On World Suicide Prevention Day 2020 Champs Public Health Collaborative held an online live event themed ‘Hope and Recovery in the time of Covid-19’. The event was an opportunity to look back at some of the achievements over the last 5 years and receiving the award of Suicide Safer Community status. Speakers included Sheena Cumiskey, Chief Executive, Cheshire & Wirral Partnership Foundation Trust and Ged Flynn, Chief Executive Papyrus – Prevention of Young Suicide with Louise Gittins Leader of Cheshire West and Cheshire Council as Chair.

You can view the presentation from the event here.

Videos can be viewed here.

World Suicide Prevention Day 2019

In 2019 the focus of the World Suicide Prevention Day event in C&M was on the portrayal of suicide in the media and the press. Communications teams, media, journalists and partners were invited to an event which aimed to educate on best practice when reporting and writing about suicide, with Samaritans presenting on their robust media guidance. The event was also an opportunity to hear from local organisations working towards preventing suicide.

Clarke Carlisle, former professional footballer, alongside his wife Carrie Carlisle gave a moving personal account of his journey, battling suicidal thoughts and following several attempts to take his own life.

You can view presentations from the event here

World Suicide Prevention Day 2018

In 2018, Champs Public Health Collaborative worked alongside Merseycare and the Zero Suicide Alliance (ZSA) to promote the ZSA’s 20 minute See, Say, Signpost online training – encouraging people to take the training and raise awareness of what can be done by members of the public to help prevent suicide.

World Suicide Prevention Day 2017

A few days prior to World Suicide Prevention Day, the annual NO MORE Suicide Summit took place, where an update on the NO MORE Suicide strategy was launched. Speakers included Prof Rory O’Connor from the University of Glasgow, Prof Louis Appleby from the University of Manchester, and Alice Newton from Papyrus. A moving video was also presented during the event in which Heidi Moulton talks about the loss of her son Stefan to suicide.

You can view the film Stefan’s Socks here

World Suicide Prevention Day 2016

In 2016 Champs Public Health Collaborative joined a national campaign led by the National Suicide Prevention Alliance (NSPA) and Andy’s Man Club to get men talking about their mental health. #ITSOKAYTOTALK followed on from a successful social media campaign which reached millions in the previous months. 

The annual Suicide Prevention Summit took place in February 2016. The event was a collaboration between Everton in the Community and Champs Public Health Collaborative and focused on Men’s mental health, in order to actively engage and influence men. Speakers included representatives from men’s organisations including CALM, Men’s Minds Matter, State of Mind, Opening Up Cricket and Everton in the Community.

World Suicide Prevention Day 2015

The NO MORE Suicide Strategy was launched on WSPD as part of a joint approach with Mersey Care NHS Trust, with a bold vision to try and eliminate suicide within the region.

The event included several notable speakers Professor Louis Appleby, the Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Manchester and Chair of the National Suicide Prevention Strategy Advisory Group with the Department of Health, Dr David Fearnley, Medical Director at Mersey Care NHS Trust, Dr Rita Robertson, Director of Public Health at Warrington Council, and Angela Samata, presenter of BBC documentary ‘Life After Suicide’ and member of the All Party Parliamentary Group – Suicide and Self Harm Prevention.

Professor Appleby said:  “When I started in suicide research 25 years ago there was a widespread view that suicide was often inevitable, that it could be postponed but not prevented, that clinical services had little to offer against what was essentially a social phenomenon.

“Joint initiatives like this one between Champs Public Health Collaborative and Mersey Care NHS Trust show that view has changed. There is a strong sense now that the stigma of suicide can be overcome, that people can get through a suicidal crisis and that frontline staff have the skills to make a difference.”